The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is continuing its crackdown on misbehaving passengers.

by Daniel McCarthy / 

(Fortunately, Adventures For Solo Travelers are comprised of good travelers and this has never been a problem in our 30+ years).

After instituting a zero-tolerance policy toward unruly passengers last summer, a policy that resulted in over $1 million in fines across almost 4,000 incidents, the FAA this week announced that it was proposing even more fines, this time for “unruly behavior involving alcohol.”

The FAA is proposing $161,823 in civil penalties against eight airline passengers for incidents specifically involving alcohol.

The incidents include an April Southwest flight from San Jose to San Diego when a passenger, who brought their own alcohol on their flight, sexually assaulted a flight attendant, and then smoke marijuana in the cabin’s lavatory. The FAA has proposed a $40,823 fine against that passenger.

The report also includes a March Delta Air Lines flight from Fort Myers to Detroit where a passenger who appeared intoxicated and admitted to drinking before the flight, took off his facemask, swore at passengers and accused them of stealing his property, and then threatened a crewmember, causing the flight to divert to Atlanta. The FAA proposed a $24,000 fine against him.

Another example is a March incident that occurred on an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Burbank when a passenger who refused to put on a facemask demanded a refund on the flight because he was skipped for food and drink service when he was sleeping. He then became combative with flight attendants when they asked to him again wear his facemask after he finished a drink they had delivered.

After he was served another drink, he threw it to the floor and stomped on it. The FAA has proposed a $34,250 fine against him.

According to the FAA, those three incidents are just some of the nearly 300 passenger disturbances due to alcohol and intoxication since Jan. 1, 2021. In order to combat the trend, the FAA has asked airports to prevent passengers from bringing “to-go” cups of alcohol aboard their airplane and only allow the cabin crew to serve them inflight.

The report is the continuation of a troubling trend for flight crews who have been tasked with enforcing a lot of the new COVID-19 measures, like face mask requirements, since the pandemic began. While a typical year sees unruly incidents top out somewhere around 150, COVID-19 has caused chaos in the skies and has left flight attendants to endure more than ever, with close to 4,000 reports in 2021.

Most famously this year, there was an incident of an unruly passenger on a Frontier flight from Philadelphia to Miami earlier this month when attendants had to duct-tape a passenger to a seat because of his behavior that went viral.

The FAA has taken extraordinary steps to try and get passengers to comply with the new COVID-19 rules, including a marketing campaign that asked passengers to treat airplanes like a trip to grandma’s house.

Adventures For Solo Travelers tries to make traveling easier for everyone in your groups.  Still, traveling may seem complicated, especially if your trip includes international travel. Each country sets its testing protocols and restrictions, with some cities and states offering more travel rules than others. We try to answer these  questions in our trip tips to help our solo travelers.

Although we are more than a year and a half into the pandemic, the COVID-19 delta variant made it more challenging to move forward as the world reopened after a long shutdown. It’s possible to plan a trip now and large numbers of Americans are traveling domestically and abroad, but it’s crucial to be aware of the rules and regulations imposed at your destination.

Travel insurance is an essential financial safeguard that may also be required, depending on where you want to go. Not all travel plans cover COVID-related medical expenses and cancellations, however.   Buy Travel Insurance

Know why you’re buying this insurance. Be sure you phone the travel insurance company asking them specifically if they will cover exactly what you’re looking for. If not, find a different company.

Some Countries Require Visitors To Carry Travel Insurance Coverage

As more Americans resume international travel, they must deal with the more than two dozen countries (at the time of this article posting) that require medical and travel coverage for COVID-related illness and incidents. Getting essential medical care while traveling abroad can be prohibitively expensive, and smaller countries with less-robust healthcare systems must protect themselves. U.S. health insurance plans don’t usually provide coverage for medical care in another country.

In some countries, visitors must provide proof that they have travel insurance that covers the costs of their medical care in case they contract COVID while abroad. Some countries also require coverage for expenses related to mandatory quarantining if visitors test positive for COVID.

Many countries also require proof of a recent negative COVID test before they’ll allow visitors to enter. Due to the varying requirements, it’s essential to learn about the latest rules for entering another country before leaving for your trip.

Benét J. Wilson – Nov 2, 2021
It’s not an understatement to say that the COVID-19 pandemic has devastated airport finances, which (in turn) has severely affected the passenger experience.  But the current state of airports can’t be blamed on the pandemic alone. “Airport infrastructure suffered from chronic underfunding even before this steep decline in air travelers,” according to a report (warning: PDF link) issued in March 2021 by the Airports Council International-North America, which represents airports in the U.S. and Canada.

This underfunding has led to airports prioritizing smaller, more immediate projects — like the maintenance of aging systems and infrastructure — over making investments in larger, higher-impact projects that would modernize and increase airport capacity. It has also led to a $115 billion backlog of planned infrastructure projects and tens of billions of dollars more in delayed or canceled projects, according to the report.

According to Kevin Burke, president and CEO of ACI-NA, the industry wouldn’t have survived without the $20 billion included for airports in the CARES Act, passed in March 2020. Airports must make bond payments every year to cover construction and improvement costs, something that the decrease in air traffic made tougher to do, he said.  “Without a flow of traffic — we were down to 89,000 people passing through TSA checkpoints in April 2020 — we realized that we needed help from the federal government,” Burke said. “We ended up doing a full-out lobbying campaign with Congress to talk about how important airports were for the recovery of the economy.”

The $20 billion kept the airports open, kept employees working and ensured that bills were paid, said Burke. “The $20 billion was a godsend to us, but we’re still struggling. We’re not anywhere close to where we were before in 2019 in terms of our passenger numbers, but it is getting better,” he said.

Victoria M. Walker Nov 2, 2021

Nobody likes a delayed flight.  But with several airlines, such as American and Southwest, experiencing operational meltdowns lately, it’s not inconceivable that you’ll experience a flight delay if you’re traveling right now. On Oct. 31, more than 9,700 flights within, into or out of the United States were delayed, according to data from the flight-tracking website FlightAware.

However, before you head off to the airport lounge to drink away your sorrows, there are some things you need to know about flight delays. And, in some instances, you may even be entitled to financial compensation for your inconvenience.

Here’s what you should do if you find out your flight’s been delayed.

Check-in with the gate agent

Don’t skip off to the airport lounge immediately after finding out about a flight delay.

I’ve, admittedly, been guilty of this, and it’s almost caused me to miss a twice-delayed flight. After getting delayed during a flight a few years back, I figured I had enough time to grab some food, drink and catch a cat nap at the lounge. I hadn’t realized that the flight had somehow been “un-delayed” until I’d happened to wake up a short time later. With just minutes to spare before the boarding doors closed, I arrived to catch my connecting flight — harried and out of breath.

I would have avoided this entirely had I checked with the gate agent to find out the new time or asked an employee at the lounge. They typically know these things.

Another thing: Don’t rely solely on the airport departure and arrival board as they are sometimes not updated. They’re usually accurate, but you’re likely to have the most up-to-date flight departure information if you’ve downloaded your airline’s app to your phone.

On a recent flight between my hometown airport Norfolk (ORF) and New York (LGA), I found out my outbound flight had been delayed minutes before the gate agent announced it over the intercom. Having multiple sources of information, especially as more flights experience operational delays these days, is better than relying on just one source.

Know your credit card’s delay and cancellation policy

We talk a lot about how to make your travel rewards credit cards work for you here at TPG. But that isn’t only about earning elite status with airlines or finding the best lounge to plane-spot. Sometimes, your credit card can come in handy when a trip doesn’t go quite as planned.

One underrated benefit that can come to the rescue when things go wrong: trip delay coverage, as my colleague, TPG senior editor Nick Ewen wrote earlier this summer. A delay isn’t just frustrating: It can cause you to miss a crucial flight segment and potentially leave you stranded at an airport.

Trip delay protection ensures that you won’t be responsible for additional (reasonable) expenses that occur due to a lengthy trip delay. However, some credit cards can save you money and hassle if you’re delayed due to weather, operational problems, strikes or other unplanned events. You will likely need to pay for the expenses upfront, but you may be eligible for reimbursement afterward.

Credit cards with trip delay protection include:

The Chase Sapphire Reserve covers delays from 6 hours or overnight, with a maximum coverage amount of $500. ($550 annual fee)
The Chase Sapphire Preferred Card covers delays from 12 hours or overnight, with a maximum coverage amount of $500. ($95 annual fee)
The Platinum Card® from American Express covers delays from 6 hours, with a maximum coverage of $500 per covered trip. ($695 annual fee — see rates & fees)
The Delta SkyMiles® Reserve American Express Card covers delays from 6 hours, with a maximum coverage of $500 per covered trip. ($550 annual fee — see rates & fees)
You may be eligible for a refund

Know your rights if there’s a delay or cancellation.

If you decide not to fly your originally scheduled flight due to significant delays and cancellations, you should get your money or points back. Airlines will generally try and push a voucher on you, but you don’t have to settle for it and are entitled to cash.

You may have a cancel and refund option available to you online or in the airline’s app. But as I’ve found in the past, the airlines often won’t make it simple to ask for a refund, so you may end up having to call the customer service line. Just remember, even if the airline offers you a voucher or even miles, you’re typically entitled to a cash refund.

You have even more options if your travel falls under the EU261 regulation — which establishes rules on compensation and assistance to passengers in the event of denied boarding, cancellation or long flight delays.  EU261 provides you some travel protections if your flight is delayed at departure, depending on how long your delay was. If you arrived at your final destination with a delay of more than three hours, you are entitled to compensation (unless the delay was due to extraordinary circumstances, like terrorism.)

 

July 30, 2021
Let’s admit it, sometimes the hardest step of planning a trip is making the decision to actually go. Oftentimes, we dream up vacations, make bucket lists of all the places we’d like to visit and tell ourselves this will be the year we will finally make travel a priority… then it doesn’t happen.
You start to come up with any and every excuse as to why you just can’t go on that trip or why you shouldn’t take that vacation. It’s easier to stay in our comfort zone and convince ourselves we should just stay home. So, we ignore that nagging feeling to hop a flight and simply get back to work.
STOP RIGHT THERE. This isn’t where the story ends, because there are so many reasons why you should travel. You deserve that vacation! You should be using your PTO (that’s what it’s there for!). Beyond its proven health benefits, travel offers us a break from our daily lives. It’s a chance to refresh and recharge. It’s a MUST.

Still not convinced? Read on, my friend. Below, we’ve got a list of 6 reasons that you should stop waiting and travel NOW. It’s time to finally book that flight!

1. Money returns, time does not.
Everyone’s financial situation is different, we get it. We aren’t saying to spend your life’s savings to take a trip. But here’s the hard truth: you can’t get your time back. It’s as simple as that. There’s always a way to make more money. Cut your expenses, pick up a side hustle, work an extra shift, have a garage sale, etc. There are so many ways to make more money. But, you can’t make more time.
Also, travel can be cheaper than you think. It doesn’t have to cost you an arm and a leg. There are tons of tips and tricks out there for saving money while traveling. Even just taking a short 2-day trip on a budget is better than taking no trip at all.

2. You deserve a break.
We live in a society that tells us we always have to go, go, go. On to the next thing. There’s work to be done. We think, “I can’t take a vacation!” or, “I just don’t have the time.” or even, “I don’t deserve a break.” HOLD UP. Yes, actually you do deserve to take a break. We all do. You deserve to genuinely enjoy your life.
Not to mention, that it’s proven when workers do take a break, it sparks creativity and they often come back being more productive. Sometimes a short trip or vacation is what you need to be better in your day-to-day.

3. You could learn something new…
…about yourself and the world!
You can read books and take classes, or watch the news. You can hear stories and meet people from other places. But, until you actually GO and experience a place for yourself, you will never know what it’s truly like. There are so many different types of people and places out there to be discovered!
You’ll also learn so much about yourself. Travel can be the greatest of teachers if you’re willing to let it. We totally believe that the greatest things can come from stepping outside your comfort zone!

4. You’ll meet some amazing people along the way.
Vacation friends, anyone? This is one of the huge bonuses of taking the time to step away from your routine. It opens you up to new experiences and that means new people! You can form connections with someone you may not have otherwise. It could start a fun new tradition or an unexpected friendship. It can be one of the most beautiful parts of traveling.

5. Do it for the stories and experiences!
When it’s your time to leave the world, I can guarantee you won’t be reflecting on that day you went to the office from 9-5 and then went home and mowed your lawn. You’ll be looking back at those once-in-a-lifetime experiences. The days where you did things that were carefree and fun. Life can be unexpected. We don’t know what’s waiting for us in that next chapter, so make memories and create stories with the people you love, and do it NOW.

6. Adventure awaits.
You have no idea what is waiting for you if you take a chance and go on an adventure. Our best memories and moments have come when we stepped out of my comfort zone, took a chance, and booked the flight. If you open yourself up to what’s possible, amazing things will happen! Even if it’s only a short trip, you just don’t know who you could meet or what experience could change your life. Staying in your comfort zone, in that normal daily routine day in and day out, likely won’t bring any new or exciting experiences. You have to step outside, that’s where the adventures are!

Adventures For Solo Travelers thanks the author  Wild Bum  https://blog.wildbum.com/2021/07/30/6-reasons-to-stop-waiting-and-travel-now/

Did you know that a U.S. government study concluded onboard air is safer than air in homes or operating rooms!  It surprised us at Adventures For Solo Travelers too, but when we thought about it, it makes sense.  We know many people in the airline industry and haven’t heard of anyone that caught it.  Planes were actually unhealthy these people are dropping like flies.   That’s not happening and that’s a good thing.   I know it’s not exactly scientific but forms my views in part.  In December I (Suzy Davis) will lead a small group of 22 solo travelers wonderful adventure to Dubai & Maldives. Personally, I can’t wait to get back in the air.  This has been the longest I’ve been grounded in over 40 years!  I REALLY miss it.

October 19, 2020– Air on commercial airplanes is safer than the air circulating in homes or hospital operating rooms, according to a recent study conducted for the U.S. Department of Defense.

The study attributed high air exchange rates, HEPA-filters and downward ventilation systems with a 99.7% reduction in the risk of coronavirus transmission through air onboard after testing two aircraft fleet types used for commercial flights, even when all seats are filled. Delta remains committed to blocking middle seats on all flights through at least Jan. 6 to provide more space for customers on all aircraft, while limiting overall capacity.

“The 767 and 777 both removed particulate 15 times faster than a home and five to six times faster than recommended design specifications for modern hospital operating or patient isolation rooms,” according to the report.

Delta’s focus on keeping the onboard air clean and safe is a key layer of protection Delta works to provide to its customers and employees. The air on Delta aircraft is completely refreshed 10 to 30 times per hour (every 2 to 6 minutes) with fresh outside air or air that has been recirculated through industrial-grade HEPA filters, which extract more than 99.99% of particles, including viruses.

Delta replaces these industrial-grade HEPA filters twice as often as recommended and is installing LEED Platinum MERV14 filters to provide cleaner air while aircraft are parked, which can result in a significant reduction in air particles and cleaner air in jetbridges.

“In addition to continually innovating and setting the new standard of cleanliness, it’s also our job to share science-based facts and research with our customers to help them feel informed and comfortable when they return to the skies,” said Bill Lentsch, Delta’s Chief Customer Experience Officer.

Delta has implemented layers of protection from check-in to baggage claim to deliver a new standard of cleanliness, more space and safer service and care for customers and employees alike. Delta’s comprehensive list of more than 100 safety actions is collectively known as the Delta CareStandard – it includes sanitizing aircraft surfaces with electrostatic spray before every flight, blocking middle seats while capping aircraft capacity, enforcing mask-wearing requirements and changing aircraft HEPA filters twice as often as recommended – all to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

We at Adventures For Solo Travelers, are always studying travel spending countless hours reading travel articles.  This was interesting…

Planes filter air even faster than standard hospital operating room, DoD study says

“The results are in: Your exposure to COVID-19 is almost non-existent on our flights,” United tweeted about the study.

The air is changed in the jets even more frequently than in a standard hospital operating room, the study found. It takes just six minutes for 99.99% of particles to be filtered out of the cabin.

Airlines have taken a big hit as the coronavirus pandemic caused travelers to cancel, postpone or not book flights. As of last week, domestic air travel was still down 62% and international air travel was down 79% compared to a year ago, according to industry group Airlines for America.

Even on a long flight, the risk of exposure is “minimal,” the study found. The higher risk comes from sitting in the same row as someone with the virus, followed by the rows directly in front and behind them.

The greatest risk may come from talking to a neighboring passenger while eating or drinking without a mask, which the study didn’t specifically test.

The researchers noted that they only tested with standard three-ply surgical masks, one of the most popular types and the same kind the airline supplies. However, other face coverings like gaiters, cotton masks or masks made of other materials could vary in their effectiveness.

It also may not be easy to ensure everyone will follow airlines’ mask requirements. Reports of disputes over passengers refusing to wear masks have popped up regularly since the summer, and even if a maskless passenger is kicked off a plane, other people could have already been exposed.

The study also suggested that it’s beneficial to load passengers in smaller groups and allow space on jetways to maintain social distancing.

United and the other major U.S. airlines are requiring passengers to wear masks aboard their planes. The airlines have also added other safety protocols like increased cleaning and reduced contact with flight attendants.

 

SOLO TRAVEL TOURS –

What is the state of Solo Group Travel today?  How will singles travel groups move forward?  USTOA has some data on this.  Let’s take a look…

USTOA Survey: 2021 Will Most Likely See Travel Recovery

by Matt Turner

Aug 28, 2020 11:37am

“The United States Tour Operators Association (USTOA) released new findings from surveys of its Tour Operator Active Members and destination management Associate Members about post-COVID-19 plans for recovery and resumption of business—and not much of it is good.

According to the survey, just over one-third (38 percent) of active members have seen an increase in bookings in the last 60 days; another third (38 percent) have seen no change in bookings during this timeframe, with the remaining 24 percent reporting a decrease in bookings. In the June survey, two-thirds of tour operators reported an increase in bookings over the previous 60 days.

As a follow-up, USTOA asked when new passengers are booked to travel, based solely on bookings made in the last 60 days. Active Members reported the following:

While 10 percent have bookings made for the third quarter of 2020, another 19 percent of responding Active Members report that they have new passenger bookings scheduled for travel in the fourth quarter of 2020

One-third (33 percent) say they have received bookings for Q1 2021 travel

Three-fourths (76 percent) report passenger bookings for second quarter of 2021

Eight out of ten Active Members (79 percent) are reporting travel bookings for the third quarter of 2021

Half (52 percent) report new bookings being made for Q4 2021 travel

Roughly one-third (31 percent) of members report new passenger bookings for 2022

Best tour companies solo travelers destinations update:

Nearly three-fourths (73 percent) of current Active Member traveler bookings are to “international” destinations, the remaining 27 percent of traveler bookings are to North America (U.S., Canada and Mexico). 

USTOA asked when Active Members anticipate restarting operations in destinations around the world. The results are as follows:

Africa: Nearly a half (43 percent) of tour operators foresee restarting operations in the first quarter of 2021, while one-quarter (27 percent) anticipate returning to the region in the second quarter of 2021.

Antarctica: A quarter (24 percent) of respondents with itineraries to Antarctica anticipate resuming operations in the second quarter of 2021, showing a significant change from the June survey where 0 percent of members said they had anticipated returning within that same timeframe.  Roughly 18 percent of Active Members anticipate a first quarter 2021 return. 

Asia: Six in 10 Active Member respondents (60 percent) foresee a potential return to Asia between the first and second quarters of 2021.

Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands: The most selected response for a potential operations restart in the region was the third quarter of 2021 at 33 percent. This reflects a significant shift in timing compared to the June Active Member survey, where more than half (53 percent) anticipated resuming operations to the region during the first quarter of 2021. 

Canada: More than one-third (38 percent) of Active Members see the second quarter of 2021 as the potential return to operations in Canada, while another quarter (28 percent) anticipate returning to the region in the first quarter of 2021.  Results from the survey conducted in June reported that nearly half (48 percent) of respondents were optimistic in returning to Canada between September and October 2020; now only 10 percent anticipate a return within that timeframe. 

Central America: The most selected response for a potential operations restart in the region was the first quarter of 2021 at 52 percent, jumping up from 33 percent in the June survey. 

Europe: More than one-third (37 percent) of respondents anticipate resuming operations in Europe in the first quarter of 2021, reflecting a big shift from the survey conducted in June, which reported that a similar 33 percent anticipated a September 2020 return. None of the current survey respondents anticipate returning to Europe next month.  

Mexico: One-third (32 percent) of tour operator respondents with programs in Mexico anticipate returning in the first quarter of 2021, showing a 12 percent increase from the June research report.

South America: Almost half (44 percent) of tour operators with programs to countries in South America anticipate resuming operations in the first quarter of 2021, showing a 14 percent increase compared to the survey response in June. Another 19 percent anticipate resuming operations within the second quarter of 2021.

United States: Respondents showed new optimism for an August 2020 return to business, with the response jumping to 34 percent, compared to 11 percent reported in the June survey.

DMO Update 

USTOA asked destination management Associate Members when their destination anticipates opening tourism to North American travelers. Almost half (46 percent) of the respondents selected “other,” which included a select number of countries that are open now with testing and quarantine restrictions, but a majority noted “too early to determine” (up from 32 percent in the June survey). According to the same DMO Associate Member survey, roughly 14 percent anticipate a January 2021 opening for North American tourism, while another 14 percent expect to open in April 2021 or beyond.   

The survey also reflected a sizable change in the expectation of a September 2020 reopening for North American travelers. In June, 17 percent of DMO respondents anticipated reopening to North America next month; now, that number has decreased to 5 percent.

Product Types and Group Size 

DMOs named FIT as the tourism product they believe will come back the soonest and strongest as their destination begins to reopen to tourism. Small groups (less than 26 passengers) was ranked second, nature/adventure in third, followed by luxury, medium groups (20-50 passengers), large groups (50-plus passengers) and river cruises. Ocean cruises was ranked to come back last.

When asked what group size limitations may be in place once tourism from North America is open, more than a third of USTOA DMO Associate Members selected it was “too early to determine” for both coaches (38 percent) and gatherings (37 percent). For coaches, 16 percent responded that size limitations may be up to 20 people maximum, while 9 percent noted potential group size limitations of up to 50 people, and 8 percent selected up to 10 people. Roughly 5 percent responded that coach limitation could be set at up to 15 people, while another 5 percent selected a limitation of up to 100 people. Only 2 percent selected coach size limitations of up to five people maximum. The remaining 19 percent selected “other.” 

When it comes to health and safety practices, an overwhelming 91 percent of DMOs say they will use their own governments’ health and hygiene protocol. More than half (57 percent) reported that they will rely on World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)/World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, while 31 percent noted that other health organizations guidelines will be utilized.

The Active Member survey was completed on August 14, with a 64 percent response rate of Active Member brands. The destination management survey was completed on August 19, with a 49 percent response rate of DMO Associate Members.

Source USTOA.

Here’s a great article to help single travelers stay abreast of the solo travel news. Our travel groups for solo travelers are not your typical tourists, they are informed travelers.   Adventures For Solo Travelers or “AFS” started as Adventures For Singles nearly 30 years ago.  Today we are paused, but will still leading groups around the world in 2021.

American, Delta join United in axing change fees
By Robert Silk |Aug 31, 2020

American and Delta have followed United, announcing that they won’t bring back change fees on domestic airfares, with the exception of basic economy fares.
The announcements, made within minutes of each other Monday afternoon, followed a similar one United made a day earlier.
American, though, is going further than its Big Three rivals, also announcing the long-term end of change fees on flights to Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.
Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, all three carriers charged fees of $200 for any itinerary changes unless flyers paid a premium for a changeable ticket. Airlines suspended those fees at the beginning of the Covid-19 crisis, but until now the suspensions had been planned as temporary ones.

Getting rid of the fees could be costly for airlines. In 2019, mainline U.S. carriers earned $2.84 billion in change and cancellation fees, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Delta hauled in $830 million, American brought in $819 million and United brought in $625 million.
Before the pandemic, Southwest was the only mainline U.S. carrier that didn’t charge change fees.
Under the policy announced by United on Sunday, flyers who make changes will be issued a voucher that lasts a year. If the voucher is used on a fare that is cheaper than the original fare, a customer will lose the difference in value.

American said Monday that its policy will be more customer friendly. Flyers who buy a less expensive flight after a change will keep whatever is left over as a credit for future travel.
Delta did not specify what its voucher policy would be.
American also said that beginning Oct. 1 it will do away with its $75 same-day standby fee.
In addition, later in the fall the carrier will for the first time offer upgrade privileges and access to main cabin preferred and main cabin extra seats to Elite status AAdvantage members traveling with basic economy tickets.

#singlesTravelInternational


 We just returned from a springtime immersion in the land of windmills on a tour never to be forgotten. Everyone in the Netherlands bikes and the rest of the world is catching on to the joy of Slow Travel to deeply connect to the landscapes and culture.  April was the best month to experience the charming wonders of Haarlem, Alkmaar, Leiden, Gouda, Pumerand and dynamic Amsterdam.

 I am not a biker, but discovered this to be exceedingly delightful. The key is a good guide.  Click to read on...